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A Cumulative View

In support of music education:

Ninety-two (92) percent of people who play an instrument say they were glad they learned to do so, according to a 2000 Gallup Poll.

- Gallup Poll Shows Strong Support for Putting Music in Every School’s Curriculum, Giles Communications, 2000.


The scores of elementary instrumental music students on standardized math tests increased with each year they participated in the instrumental program.

- “Music Training Helps Underachievers,” Nature, May 26, 1996.


Nine out of ten adults and teenagers who play instruments agree that music making brings the family closer together.

- Music Making and Our Schools, American Music Conference, 2000.


Students who can perform complex rhythms can also make faster and more precise corrections in many academic and physical situations, according to the Center for Timing, Coordination, and Motor Skills.

- Rhythm seen as key to music’s evolutionary role in human intellectual development, Center for Timing,

Coordination, and Motor Skills, 2000.


A ten-year study indicates that students who study music achieve higher test scores, regardless of socioeconomic background.

- Dr. James Catterall, UCLA.


A 1997 study of elementary students in an arts-based program concluded that students’ math test scores rose as their time in arts education classes increased.

- “Arts Exposure and Class Performance,” Phi Delta Kappan, October, 1998.


First-grade students who had daily music instruction scored higher on creativity tests than a control group without music instruction.

- K.L. Wolff, The Effects of General Music Education on the Academeic Achievement, Perceptual-Motor

Development, Creative Thinking, and School Attendance of First-Grade Children, 1992.


In a Scottish study, one group of elementary students received musical training, while another other group received an equal amount of discussion skills training. After six (6) months, the students in the music group achieved a significant increase in reading test scores, while the reading test scores of the discussion skills group did not change.

- Sheila Douglas and Peter Willatts, Journal of Research in Reading, 1994.


According to a 1991 study, students in schools with arts-focused curriculums reported significantly more positive perceptions about their academic abilities than students in a comparison group.

- Pamela Aschbacher and Joan Herman, The Humanitas Program Evaluation, 1991.


Students who are rhythmically skilled also tend to better plan, sequence, and coordinate actions in their daily lives.

- “Cassily Column,” TCAMS Professional Resource Center, 2000.


In a 1999 Columbia University study, students in the arts are found to be more cooperative with teachers and peers, more self-confident, and better able to express their ideas. These benefits exist across socioeconomic levels.

- The Arts Education Partnership, 1999.


College admissions officers continue to cite participation in music as an important factor in making admissions decisions. They claim that music participation demonstrates time management, creativity, expression, and open-mindedness.

- Carl Hartman, “Arts May Improve Students’ Grades,” The Associated Press, October, 1999.


On the 1999 SAT, music students continued to outperform their non-arts peers, scoring 61 points higher on the verbal portion and 42 points higher on the math portion of the exam.

- Steven M. Demorest and Steven J. Morrison, “Does Music Make You Smarter?,” Music Educators Journal, September, 2000.


Students who participate in All-State ensembles consistently score over 200 points higher on the SAT than non-music students. This figure indicates that students can pursue excellence in music while also excelling academically.

- Texas Music Educators Association, 1988-1996.


Students with good rhythmic performance ability can more easily detect and differentiate between patterns in math, music, science, and the visual arts.

- “Rhythm seen as key to man’s evolutionary development,” TCAMS Professional Resource Center, 2000.


Students in arts programs are more likely to try new things, and they can better express their own ideas to friends, teachers, and parents.

- Champions of Change, the President’s Council on the Arts and Humanities, 1999.


College students majoring in music achieve scores higher than students of all other majors on college reading exams.

- Carl Hartman, “Arts May Improve Students’ Grades,” The Associated Press, October, 1999.


Music students demonstrate less test anxiety and performance anxiety than students who do not study music.

- “College-Age Musicians Emotionally Healthier than Non-Musician Counterparts,” Houston Chronicle,

1998.


The average scores achieved by music students on the 1999 SAT increased for every year of musical study. This same trend was found in SAT scores of previous years.

- Steven M. Demorest and Steven J. Morrison, “Does Music Make You Smarter?,” Music Educators Journal, September, 2000.


A majority of the engineers and technical designers in Silicon Valley are also practicing musicians.

- The Case for Sequential Music Education in the Core Curriculum of the Public Schools, Center for the

Arts in the Basic Curriculum, 1997.


Second and third grade students who were taught fractions through musical rhythms scored one hundred (100) percent higher on fractions tests than those who learned in the conventional manner.

- “Rhythm Students Learn Fractions More Easily,” Neurological Research, March 15, 1999


Students involved in arts programs had significantly higher class attendance rates than a comparison group.

- Pamela Aschbacher and Joan Herman, The Humanitas Program Evaluation, 1991.


Classroom teachers in Rhode Island noted improved behavior and attitudes among a test group of students given intensive arts training.

- “Music Training Helps Underachievers,” Nature, May 26, 1996


Ninth grade students in a Chicago arts program achieved reading scores that were a full grade level higher than students not in the program. All other variables, including race, gender, and socioeconomic status, were equal in this study.

- CAPE Study, President’s Council on the Arts and Humanities, 2000.


When faced with a problem to solve, students in music and the arts produce more possible solutions, and their solutions are more creative, according to a nationwide study.

- N. M. Weinberger, “Arts Education Enhances ‘Real Life’ Personal Skills,” MuSICA Research Notes,

Spring 2000.

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June 1st Recital -- Details & Directions

The student recital will be held Saturday, June 1st in the CSUEB Music Building in room 1055.
For a CSUEB campus map, follow this link (the Music Building is the donut-shaped building on the left of the map, abbreviated as "MB").
**Weekend parking at CSUEB is free
There will be 2 groups of performers: - Group 1 starts at 2:30pm - Group 2 starts at 4:00pm
Each student will know ahead of time which group they are a part of.
Performers:  - please arrive 20-30 minutes early  - dress code: nice casual; no jeans, t-shirts, or tennis shoes
 - performers with long hair: plan to wear your hair up or pulled back
For a Google Map of the CSUEB Hayward Hills Campus, follow this link For detailed driving directions to CSUEB from anywhere in the bay area, follow this link
No tickets required for this event -- all are welcome.
Still have questions? Email me at jessemicek@yahoo.com